Human-nature interaction

If Wishes were (Sea) Horses

If Wishes were (Sea) Horses

I was one of those horse crazy girls – to the extent that if I saw a stray horse, I’d have my school tights off in a flash to make a bridle, and bring the horse home to protect it from being run over. Must have driven my parents nuts.  However, older, wiser and living on a small house block in the middle of town really prevents my horse dreams… but is there another way??

Ohhh, maybe….  Seahorse World in Beauty Point has thousands (millions?) of (sea) horses, and has created a fabulous industry in exporting these black and white, dappled and grey beauties of the underwater world to the world. Small industries like this fascinate me.  A beautiful niche market, but with such reach, and open to the public to wander through.

The company has a breeding program for the Tasmanian seahorses, as well as a program to breed specific colours.  Seahorses can change colour, but apparently not as camouflage (maybe it’s just a yellow kind of day?).  They are found all over the world, but the majority live below the equator, and around Tasmania, a careful check of the kelp beds can help you find your very own horse.

Every child is taught that seahorse dads (stallions?) are the responsible parent, carrying the babies after fertilisation until birth.  Mum specifically looks for a dad with the biggest pot-belly as a partner, and very quickly hands over all of the fertilised eggs and swims off to graze another day.  Around a thousand ‘foals’ can be born, looking like wee, little wriggly specks in the water.  Out in the ocean, this is a dangerous time.  They grow very quickly, and in specially designed tanks to mimic their home environments (warm for the tropical types, a touch on the chilly side for the tougher Tasmanian breeds), they can live for up to four years.

Watching these fascinating creatures prance about, attempt to strangle each other, and feed was amazing.   Patting a seahorse is not quite the same, but without the risk of a solid kick, or a squashed foot.

Which one will you choose?

Posted by DeborahH in Australia, conservation, Fun, Human-nature interaction, Tasmania, Tourism, Weekends, 0 comments
Past present 2

Past present 2

This is another ad hoc collection, not of memories of past adventures and events, but of current adventures and events that will become those memories.

Sunset over Bass Strait.  Some days just take your breath away. 19/1/2018

Posted by DeborahH in Australia, Human-nature interaction, Past Present, Tasmania, 0 comments
Goodbye

Goodbye

I was asked recently “Why Tasmania?” as a place to live when I returned from China.  My number 1 answer is always – SNOW!!  But there are a number of other answers that add to why I have chosen Tasmania, including having ocean views from most of my windows that others pay quadruple the price for, proximity to work (5 minutes walk) and spectacular inland scenery within 10 minutes drive.  Tasmania is a smallish island, so if you feel energetic you can drive from the north to the south and back again in one day.  I also felt attuned to Tassie as people here have interesting histories, a different (island?) outlook on life. Many are refugees from the big cities, and others have generations of stories to tell. Tasmania was also in the forefront of the green movement, with what is recognised as the world’s first Green Party beginning here. For me, the use of photography as a driver for the Lake Pedder dam protests is yet another proof of the power of photography to bring about social change.  So, as a beginning to my “Why Tasmania?” intermittent series I offer a tribute to those photographers – Olegas Truchanas and Peter Dombrovskis.

Posted by DeborahH in Australia, conservation, Daily Life, Forestry, Human-nature interaction, Tasmania, 0 comments
Runaway weekend

Runaway weekend

When you live in a beautiful, interesting or exotic place, it’s very easy to attract your family and friends to visit you.  The joy of that is that you are able to show people your favourite places that only locals know, and you can explore places you don’t usually have the time for.  My ‘runaway’ Saturdays help me do some exploring, but a whole ‘runaway long weekend’ with a wonderful friend is even better.

Carrol came to visit, and we headed south with a little list of fun and frivolity planned, including the Museum of New and Old Art  (MONA) for the opening day of the new exhibition (See next post), and a couple of whisky tastings, a visit to Bruny Island and the occasional winery visit as well. Join us for our ‘runaway weekend’.

 

Posted by DeborahH in Australia, Daily Life, Fun, Human-nature interaction, Road trip, Tasmania, Tourism, Travel, Weekends, 1 comment
Easter in Australia

Easter in Australia

2 teenage girls, 3 dogs, 5 boys between seven and (nearly) eleven, nine adults, enough food to feed an army in gourmet style, enough beer and wine to allow for the odd glass or two, and a beautiful beach all equal a great Easter weekend camping. The campfire was a constant, relaxation the order of the day. Long walks on the beach, fishing, abalone diving, oyster gathering, swimming, sandcastle construction, board and card games.  And of course – the Easter Bunny!!

Easter can be the last lovely weekend of summer, or the first chilly weekend of autumn, and this one was a mix. A couple of very chilly mornings, glorious afternoons, and nights where the fire beckoned. And naturally, the final day – pack up and leave – was the best, most glorious summer day imaginable. Always.  Friends had brought an old caravan and constructed a shed on this bit of remote beach that allowed us to store food, and change in peace. They have a truly Australian open door policy – welcome to all. If you look for symbolism at Easter – this welcome is it, and it lasts all year.

Posted by DeborahH in Australia, Beach, Camping, Easter, Fun, Human-nature interaction, Nature, Tasmania, Weekends, 0 comments
Sunrise

Sunrise

I’ve been lucky enough to see some pretty magic sunrises around the world, and every sunrise is special.  Watching the world awaken and warm, everything fresh and new is wonderful. Here, in Tasmania, I don’t have to push myself to jump out of bed super early to see spectacular sunrises, for which I am very grateful.  However, the sunrises I like best aren’t the typical beautiful colours, magical mist, pretty mountain ones.  The ones I feel are really special are the ones that interact with the human element of life: people, industry, housing. That interaction of eternal nature and ephemeral humanity fascinates me.

Posted by DeborahH in Australia, Daily Life, Human-nature interaction, Nature, 0 comments